View Basket Checkout

Please note your order is processed by a human NOT a machine. In the unlikely event of getting an error on this page or it won't let you enter some of your card details, please contact me! :-) .

Signalling

Shop | Railways | Locomaster Profiles |  Signalling

Banbury Boxes North and South


Banbury Boxes North and South

Ref: LP510D


By the summer of 2016, Banbury was one of the busiest railway locations still using the Absolute Block method of signalling - a system that dates back to the 19th century. Banbury also retained many manually-operated semaphore signals, controlled by two signal boxes standing at either end of the station. With around 250 passing passenger and freight trains every 24 hours, the Signallers were constantly on their feet working the levers, block instruments and bells. Filmed inside both signal boxes in June 2016 shortly before the route underwent a £76 million upgrade, and using cab footage from passing trains, this programme shows how Banbury operated in much the same way as it did a century ago.

BANBURY NORTH BOX - early shift: The bells and levers are constantly in use as a steady stream of passenger and freight trains pass through the station. Along with Chiltern Railways and Cross Country passenger services are Great Western Railway empty stock workings and a Class 57-hauled charter train to Ascot. Among the passing freight trains are intermodal, automotive and departmental services hauled by Freightliner, DB?Cargo and Colas Class 66 and 70 locomotives. There is also a driver’s eye view of the Up Goods Loop and its semaphore signals as seen from a Trafford Park to Southampton container service. Also includes the detonator farewell after the last North Box tour on the afternoon of 2nd October.

BANBURY SOUTH BOX - late shift: In addition to the manual lever frame, South?Box also has an Entry & Exit panel controlling Aynho Junction and train movements on and off the Chiltern Line. It is very much a case of two signal boxes in one! There are also Banbury terminating and starting services for the Signaller to deal with – hence it is even busier than the nearby North Box. Featured here is the busy evening rush hour period between 17.00 and 20.00 with its increase in passenger services, which include the Class 68-hauled commuter trains out of London Marylebone. It includes the complex stabling move of the loco-hauled 17.21 service from London from platform 1 to the empty cattle road sidings. And there’s an almost endless stream of freight trains to deal with as well! Also features scenes from the final hours of South Box, including the handling of the last passing freight and the historic 7-5-5 ‘box closing’ bells to North Box in the early hours of July 29th 2016.

This DVD is introduced by Dave Penney, Managing Director of Chiltern Railways - the biggest users of the route through Banbury. This DVD has been produced with the full co-operation of Network Rail's signalling staff and provides a fascinating insight into the golden age of railway signalling. Sadly, the sound of ringing bells and clunking levers is disappearing fast as the rail network is gradually modernised. This programme is a historical reminder of a part of railway operation that is gradually being consigned to history.

Narrated by: David Maxey

First published: 2016

Running time: 80-mins





.

Price:19.90 (including VAT at 20% for customers in the UK & EU)
Price: 16.58 excluding VAT (for customers in non-EU countries e.g.Australia, New Zealand, USA, Canada)

Quantity:



To tell a friend about this item, click to Share or send an Email:




Box by Box - Selby to Peterborough via Saxilby, Swinderby & Grantham


Box by Box - Selby to Peterborough via Saxilby, Swinderby & Grantham

Ref: LP503D


This is an ideal companion cab-ride programme to the popular ‘Joint Diversion’ DVD. The featured train is GB Railfreight’s 4L78 Selby to Felixstowe service and the programme covers the journey as far as Peterborough. Filmed in July 2013, there’s a fascinating contrast of routes, traveling over slower-speed rural lines as well as sections of the high-speed East Coast Main Line past and present. It was filmed shortly before the mechanical semaphores, manual crossing gates and signal boxes were replaced on the GN&GE Joint Line on the section of route between Doncaster’s Black Carr Junction and Lincoln. The General Motors Class 66 hauling the train – 66737 - demonstrates why these locomotives have been so successful - as the spirited non-stop run from Newark up to Stoke tunnel proves!

The journey starts at the Potters terminal at Selby. Once we are out onto the Hull to Leeds main line we are then travelling on the former route of the East Coast Main Line. There’s a welcome 10mph speed restriction over the 125-year-old Selby Swing Bridge prior to its refurbishment. After passing through Selby station we continue south to Temple Hirst Junction. We then join the ECML where there’s a good run to Doncaster, via Joan Croft and Shaftholme Junctions. Between Selby and Doncaster there were a number of manually operated crossing gates and crossing boxes still in use – all of which were due to be replaced by modern automatic barriers. The journey was also filmed prior to the construction of the Shaftholme Flyover. South of Doncaster we leave the ECML at Black Carr Junction and take the former GN&GE Joint Line and head through Finningley and Beckingham. There’s even some drama when our train is unexpectedly halted by a ‘bridge strike’ near Misterton! At Gainsborough Trent Junction we pass the fine array of semaphores before continuing south through nearby Lea Road station. More surviving semaphores and crossing gates can then be seen at Stow Park and Saxilby. On the outskirts of Lincoln we take the single-track avoiding spur from Pyewipe Junction to Boultham Junction and continue past Hykeham, Swinderby (with its surviving semaphores) and Collingham before reaching Newark. Here, a standing start at the beginning of the 20-mile climb to Stoke tunnel provides a stiff test for 66737 as the 4L78 has to fit in between 125mph express passenger trains. Fortunately we are given a good run and after breasting the summit, the train finally reaches its 75mph maximum speed on the downhill run through Little Bytham, Tallington and Werrington Junction. Our journey concludes with the train's arrival in Peterborough Yard.

Narrated by: David Maxey

First published: 2014

Running time: 110-mins





.

Price:19.90 (including VAT at 20% for customers in the UK & EU)
Price: 16.58 excluding VAT (for customers in non-EU countries e.g.Australia, New Zealand, USA, Canada)

Quantity:



To tell a friend about this item, click to Share or send an Email:




Farewell to Arms - The Final Month's of Lincolnshire's Mechanical Signalling


Farewell to Arms - The Final Month's of Lincolnshire's Mechanical Signalling

Ref: LP506D


Most rail enthusiasts have at some point made the pilgrimage to Barnetby. With plenty of semaphore signals there and at nearby Wrawby Junction, and with freight trains outnumbering passenger services, Barnetby has always been one of Britain’s most popular railway locations. Sadly, the re-signalling of the Scunthorpe to Cleethorpes route at the end of 2015 will see not only the removal of the semaphore signals, but also the closure of ten signal boxes along the route. The local Network Rail staff wanted the boxes to be captured in action for posterity, and this programme is the result of that project.

In this DVD, you will see inside each and every box in the area. In the manual boxes, the Signallers are seen working the levers and block instruments in much the same way as more than a century ago in Victorian times. At the more complex boxes such as Barnetby East, Wrawby Junction and Brocklesby Junction, the Signallers explain the local layout and signalling operation.

The programme features all ten boxes along the 60-mile route that were due to close in December 2015 – Appleby, Elsham, Wrawby Junction, Barnetby East, Brocklesby Junction, Ulceby, Roxton, Stallingborough (including the original box with the gate wheel and semaphores), Marsh Junction and Pasture Street. And there’s a few more for good measure - Immingham Reception (the last surviving electrically-powered box with slide levers), Immingham West and the original box at Immingham East which closed in 2012. There’s also a quick look at the little-used Grimsby Light Railway. This DVD also includes a separate short introduction to the basics of railway signalling, including a demonstration at Wrawby Junction of how Absolute Block actually works.

The main programme highlights the sheer variety of the signalling in the area. Apart from Appleby and Elsham, no two signal boxes are identical. They are all fascinating in their own way and between them they cover virtually the entire signalling spectrum, including gate wheels, wooden staffs, hand-operated crossing gates and manual lever frames to the more modern Entrance-Exit panels. However, this programme is not just confined to the inside of the signal boxes - there are plenty of unique and previously unseen views of the passing passenger and freight trains that are usually only seen by the signalling staff. There is plenty of heavy freight traffic hauled by Class 60s and 66s with freight operators DB Schenker, GB Railfreight and Freightliner Heavy Haul working in and out of Immingham Docks and the Oil Refineries at Lindsey and Humber.

The featured signal boxes come in all shapes, sizes and ages, with the oldest structure dating back to 1883. Sadly, the sound of ringing bells and clunking levers is fast disappearing as the network is modernised. This programme is a historical reminder of a part of railway operation that is gradually being consigned to history. If you have ever stood on Barnetby station and wondered how Barnetby and Wrawby Junction signal boxes operate, then wonder no more. It’s all in this DVD!

Narrated by: David Maxey

First published: 2015

Running time: 120-mins





.

Price:19.90 (including VAT at 20% for customers in the UK & EU)
Price: 16.58 excluding VAT (for customers in non-EU countries e.g.Australia, New Zealand, USA, Canada)

Quantity:



To tell a friend about this item, click to Share or send an Email:




Mersey Boxes - Halton Junction to Liverpool Lime Street


Mersey Boxes - Halton Junction to Liverpool Lime Street

Ref: LP522D


Our third programme on traditional railway signalling covers the eighteen miles of the busy Mersey main line from Halton Junction to the terminus at Liverpool Lime Street.


Seven boxes and panels - each of them vastly different - cover this fascinating route. As well as five different passenger train operators, the route has six freight terminals dotted along it, and this programme features many of the signalling movements that are required for trains to access the various sites. At Edge Hill and Lime Street, such is the intensity of the passing passenger services that the Signaller had to provide a live running commentary as he signalled the trains! As you will see, there is absolutely no margin for error.

The seven featured boxes are:

HALTON JUNCTION - the smallest of the seven boxes has a full size lever frame. It handles London Midland and Virgin passenger services and a variety of freight?traffic. The box also controls access to the Halton Curve.

RUNCORN - built to air raid precaution specification, this Grade 2 listed building also has a full size lever frame. Situated by Runcorn station, it also handles passenger and freight traffic as well as controlling access to the Folly Lane freight branch.

DITTON JUNCTION - has a large Entrance-Exit (NX) panel. Freight trains serving two nearby terminals require complex shunting manoeuvres and this programme features both of them.

SPEKE JUNCTION - the largest full size lever frame on this section of route, the Speke frame has 86 of them. The box also controls access to and from the Garston Freightliner and automotive terminals

ALLERTON JUNCTION - situated by Liverpool South Parkway station, this manual box houses a delightful 70 lever frame and controls access to Allerton depot. The volume of passenger trains steps up a gear as the main line is joined by the Cheshire Lines from Widnes and Warrington Central.

EDGE HILL - houses a large and complex NX panel. The volume of passenger trains steps up yet another level here with the addition of the Chat Moss route from Huyton and Manchester. The Signaller explains how Edge Hill undertakes the regulation of trains in and out of Lime Street.

LIVERPOOL LIME STREET - has a magnificent Westinghouse 'L' type power frame with 95 miniature levers. Passenger services at the terminus are so intensive that the Lime Street Signallers handle around approximately one train movement every two minutes during the day. The Signaller here provides a live commentary while an axle counter failure at Huyton adds some drama to the relentless action!


Produced with the full co-operation of Network Rail, this programme was filmed during the summer of 2017 while all seven boxes were still fully operational and before Lime Street station was remodelled. All the scenes in this programme will eventually be history - Halton Junction, Runcorn and Lime Street have already closed and the others will follow in due course.





Narrated By: David Maxey
Screen aspect ratio: 16:9
Number of discs: 1 DVD-R
Running Time: 110-mins (1hr 50min)

.

Price:19.90 (including VAT at 20% for customers in the UK & EU)
Price: 16.58 excluding VAT (for customers in non-EU countries e.g.Australia, New Zealand, USA, Canada)

Quantity:



To tell a friend about this item, click to Share or send an Email:




Shop | Railways | Locomaster Profiles |  Signalling

Buy now with PayPalvisa/mastercard accepted
spacer