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Scotland

Shop | Train Cab Rides | Great Britain & Ireland | Video 125 |  Scotland

Aberdeen to Inverness (112-mins)


Aberdeen to Inverness (112-mins)

Ref: VI919D



Of the 50 stations that have come and gone over the years, ten remain open. In little over a hundred miles we encounter 16 existing, or former, rail junctions – on average one every seven miles - a remarkable testament to the commercial rivalry and duplicity of lines between the Highland and GNSR companies in the latter half of the 19th Century.


When filmed in 2006, the route was operated by First Scotrail and plied by class 158 Express Sprinters. The route is mostly of single line and features tokenless block and electric key token sections controlled from manual signal boxes with semaphore signals. This scenic route was filmed in sunny or good weather from the cab, from the trackside and from the air.


Much of the fascinating history is to be found in the narration, expertly delivered by BBC TV's Sally Magnusson.


Filmed in 2006





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Ayrline - Stranraer to Glasgow Central


Ayrline - Stranraer to Glasgow Central

Ref: VI247D


The 101 miles of railway between the former Ferry port of Stranraer and Glasgow Central, is one of extreme contrast. For just over half that distance the line is of single track controlled by traditional mechanical signal boxes and electric tokens. The southern half of the line is so remote that our two-car class 156 Sprinter runs for 26 miles before reaching the first intermediate station at Barrhill. We traverse two passing loops in the process, the second of which at Glenwhilly is one of the remotest in the whole of the British Isles.

From Ayr, the line becomes an electrified double track for the next 40 miles into Glasgow. The contrast between the Victorian signalling and state of the art computer control inside the West of Scotland Signalling Centre at Cowlairs could hardly be greater. As well as seeing this fascinating and scenic line from the cab and signal boxes, we also see the lie of the land from the air on board a state of the art helicopter. Filmed throughout in high definition for superb picture quality.

Narrated by Paul Coia

Running time: 122-mins





Narrated By: Paul Coia, written by Richard Carr
Screen aspect ratio: 16:9
Number of discs: 1 DVD
Running Time: 122 mins (2hr 2min)

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Far North (104-mins)


Far North (104-mins)

Ref: VI956D


We start at Dingwall - the Inverness section having been covered in SkyeTrain. Much of the 142 miles from Dingwall to Wick is sparsely inhabited. The line follows the coastal contours through Invergordon to Tain. Instead of taking the direct route across the Dornoch Firth, the line heads inland via Lairg.

After Rogart we pass through the long-since closed "Mound" station still with it's platform for the Dornoch branch derelict but intact. We take a look at the remains of this erstwhile line and discover Dornoch station building still surviving. At Golspie the line became the "Duke of Sutherland's Railway" - one of the longest-ever privately built lines. Dunrobin Castle station is next on route. Here we learn a little about the Third Duke, from his great great grandson Lord Strathnaver.

By the time the train reaches Helmsdale, the coast has become more rugged than ever. From there it proved absolutely impossible to drive the railway any further along the coast, so our "Sprinter" heads inland again, this time through the remote Strath of Kildonan for 25 miles to Forsinard. At least there is a road along the valley but from there to Georgemas the railway is quite alone.

Britain's most northerly junction is where our four-car class 156 divides, one portion going to Thurso the other to Wick and we see both!





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Invergarry & Fort Augustus Railway (100 mins)


Invergarry & Fort Augustus Railway (100 mins)

Ref: VI926D


A number of wealthy individuals wanted to see rail

communication brought to the Great Glen of Scotland whatever the cost. They intended the line to run from the West Highland Railway at Spean Bridge all the way to Inverness, but in the end, only 24 miles were built as far as Fort Augustus, roughly half way.

Years late and massively over budget, the line opened in 1903 operated by the Highland Railway even though it was deep within North British territory. The line struggled right from the outset. Quite simply the line ran through such sparsely inhabited territory, there weren't enough people to use it! Realising this far too late the decision was taken to sell the line for scrap! Using original records, newspapers, old photographs, and modern day footage and interviews, the whole sorry saga unfolds.

The scars on the landscape will probably be there for eternity. Little did Parliament realise when it sanctioned the earthworks that they would only be used for around 30 years!





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Highland Mainline (90-mins)


Highland Mainline (90-mins)

Ref: VI993D


Perth is the gateway to the Highlands of Scotland and still boasts a large imposing station. The main line features stretches of double and single track with semaphore block signalling predominating to Aviemore.

There are stiff climbs to the two summits at Druimuachdar and Slochd, the latter forming the summit of the Inverness cut-off line. This direct line from Aviemore to Inverness was a major feat of civil engineering forced upon the Highland Railway company by the threat of competition. It was completed in 1898 having taken 14 years to build. The two largest structures spanning the rivers Findhorn and Nairn are seen, like the rest of the route, not just from the cab but from a helicopter flying overhead! Stations seen include: Dunkeld and Birnam, Pitlochry, Blair Athol, Dalwhinnie, Newtonmore, Kingussie, Aviemore and Carrbridge.





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The (Old) Glasgow Subway (53-mins)


The (Old) Glasgow Subway (53-mins)

Ref: VI245D


The Glasgow Subway, the only true underground railway in Britain outside of London, was originally opened in 1896 but the Victorian carriages were still running 80 years later. Now Video 125 has found a fascinating film of the line shot in 1974 by the Universities of Glasgow and Strathclyde. Filmed in colour with sound, this remarkable record of the line is the nearest one can get to experiencing what it was like to travel on an original Victorian tube train.

The film starts with the history of the line in 1897 with old photographs, posters and diagrams. Forward to 1974 and we see the original cars, including 'gate' stock, the gates being opened on the two-car trains by the guard, still in operation. We witness the method of rescuing a broken down train in the tunnel - by being pushed out by the following train. In another example, we see passengers being evacuated from a broken down train through the tunnel.

We get a comprehensive look inside the depot as the old wooden bodied cars are kept running long after their natural expiry date. We see the cars being lifted out of the tunnel by crane - there were no points anywhere on the 6 ½ mile circular system. Uniquely, for an underground railway, the trains were originally hauled by seven mile long continuous cables, the working of which is fully explained. In 1935 the trains were adapted to run on electricity collected from a third rail, though electric lighting was still collected by pick-ups running along the tunnel walls -still in use in 1974..

We go inside the tunnels to see the track gang at work replacing a section of worn out track. We even see the battery locomotive being lowered onto the line at night. We hear from those either working or travelling on the railway, such as the Director General of the Greater Glasgow PTE, the Director of Planning and Development, the Car Sheds Superintendent (who joined in 1929) as well as a driver, electrical engineer and even some of the passengers.

This film will more than live up to the Underground enthusiast's hopes and expectations. The use of music is minimal, the commentary is informative without being intrusive and all the while we can hear the actual sounds of the trains, stations and depot as they were back in 1974. A real gem!





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The Jacobite - Fort William to Mallaig by Steam (85-mins)


The Jacobite - Fort William to Mallaig by Steam (85-mins)

Ref: VI312D



The West Highland Railway (Mallaig extension) is arguably Britain's most scenic and what better way of seeing it than from "The Jacobite" steam train.


Our cameras followed one such service in the mid-summer sunshine on board Black Five No 45407 The Lancashire Fusilier. To see the scenery in all its glory, a helicopter followed our train all the way to Mallaig with a state of the art gyro stabilised camera filming in high definition. Cameras also show, lineside shots footplate shots and the radio signalling centre (RETB) at Banavie.


So sit back and take a front row seat on the magnificent "Road to the Isles".





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The Northern Lights - Edinburgh to Aberdeen (95 mins)


The Northern Lights - Edinburgh to Aberdeen (95 mins)

Ref: VI979D


In 1996 a GNER INTERCITY 125 is our viewing platform for another superb journey through Scotland. We take in the exit from Waverley through the tunnels to Haymarket, followed by the greatest railway-age edifice of all time - the Forth Bridge - and we see it from the cab!


On the very same journey we are treated to the driver's view of Britain's longest bridge - that over the River Tay! North of Dundee, the video easily lives up to its title. With the sun gradually sinking in the clear blue sky this really is the Northern Lights! Stations stopped at or passed include: Edinburgh Waverley, Haymarket, Inverkeithing, Kirkcaldy, Cupar, Leuchars, Dundee, Broughty Ferry, Carnoustie, Abroath, Montrose and Stonehaven.


On the very same journey we are treated to the driver's view of Britain's longest bridge - that over the River Tay! North of Dundee, the video easily lives up to its title. With the sun gradually sinking in the clear blue sky this really is the Northern Lights!


Stations include: Inverkeithing, Kirkcaldy, Cupar, Broughty Ferry, Carnoustie, Abroath, Montrose and Stonehaven.





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Steam Through the Scottish Highlands (60-mins)


Steam Through the Scottish Highlands (60-mins)

Ref: VI988D


Filmed in perfect weather from the track and from the air, this is the West Highland Extension like you’ve never seen it before. Loads of footplate action, including use of the electronic token system, is just the icing on the cake of this superb trip along Britain’s most scenic railway from Fort William to Mallaig.

TV personality Clive Anderson rides on board the steam train hauled by B1 loco No 1264. He finds out all about how the service is run each year from West Coast Railway’s James Shuttleworth. This high budget production, made by Video 125 for TV, is a must for all steam lovers and lovers of spectacular scenery.





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Skye Train (90-mins)


Skye Train (90-mins)

Ref: VI947D


Shot in midsummer 1987, the route is seen at its most spectacular!

From Inverness to Dingwall we travel alongside the Beauly Firth and witness some of the last remaining Highland Railway semaphores still in operation at the time but long-since abolished.

At Dingwall we turn due west for the Highlands and traverse the summits at Raven Rock, Corriemoillie and Luib (the highest at 646ft) and stations such as Garve, Achnasheen and Strathcarron set amidst the beautiful Highland scenery.

Finally, the most spectacular section, Stromeferry to Kyle along the shores of Loch Carron. All the while we follow this classic loco-hauled train from the air. Features large logo Class 37262.





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The West Highland Line (96-mins)


The West Highland Line (96-mins)

Ref: VI965D


The fascinating history of the West Highland Railway is told by Paul Coia as we make our way from the hustle and bustle of Scotland's largest conurbation up into the Highlands and through Britain's remotest outposts.

Climbing out of the 1 in 45 Queen Street tunnel, we proceed through the suburbs of Glasgow, mostly under the wires of the Strathclyde electrics.

At Craigendoran the West Highland line branches off towards Helensburgh Upper. At first, following the course of Gare Loch and Loch Long, the line eventually emerges high above the banks of Loch Lomond. By the time we reach Crianlarich (where the Oban line diverges) the dense forest has given way to more open aspects.

The famous Horseshoe Curve is the next major feature encountered. Beyond Bridge of Orchy, the main road turns west towards Glen Coe, whilst the railway turns north east and strikes out across one of the last great wildernesses, Rannoch Moor! 95 miles from Glasgow we reach Britain's remotest station, Corrour.

Here is the summit, the old signalman's house, but little else. The line now descends alongside remote Loch Treig into the Spean Valley and civilisation once more. Running past the foothills of Ben Nevis we arrive in the West Highland capital of Fort William.





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Shop | Train Cab Rides | Great Britain & Ireland | Video 125 |  Scotland

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