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MARKLE ASSOCIATES

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Irish Rail Archive Vol.1 & 2 - Dundalk & the West of Ireland Lines (104-mins)


Irish Rail Archive Vol.1 & 2 - Dundalk & the West of Ireland Lines (104-mins)

Ref: MK101D


These two videos, along with numbers 3 and 4 of the series, were first published on VHS tape in 2000. Together they give a geographic picture of the Irish railway scene in the period from around 1967 to 1999. They have now been remastered with improved images and sound, and released as double length programmes on DVD.

Volume One features the lines from Dublin to Dundalk and Dublin to Sligo. The Branch lines featured in this section include the former Kingscourt branch, which is now closed beyond Navan. The Mullingar to Athlone line used to be the main line to Galway, but is now disused. And finally, we see the “Burma Road” line from Collooney to Claremorris which was closed in 1975.

Volume Two starts at Heuston station in Dublin, gateway to the West and South of Ireland. We follow along the Cork Main Line, stopping just short of Limerick Junction. We also travel the lines to Westport, Ballina and Galway. There then follows a short trip on the now closed branch to Loughrea. After a visit to the line between Claremorris to Limerick now the subject of re-opening schemes and known as the “Western Rail Corridor”, we return finally to Ballybrophy to see the once busy route to Killonan via Roscrea.

Trains covered include express passenger workings of air conditioned coaches hauled by 071 and 201 class locomotives, and branch workings with small GM 121, 141 and 181 and B201 class engines. One of the Knock pilgrimage trains is featured as are unusual passenger trips with a preserved Maybach engine formerly employed between North Wall and Heuston in Dublin. The freight workings are hauled by 201, 001 and 141 class locos. Finally we have the loose coupled operations at Sligo and Mayo in the 1960s and 70s.





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Irish Rail Archive Vol.3 & 4 - The South and South-East of Ireland (104-mins)


Irish Rail Archive Vol.3 & 4 - The South and South-East of Ireland (104-mins)

Ref: MK103D


These two videos, along with numbers 1 and 2 of the series, were first published on VHS tape in 2000. Together they give a geographic picture of the Irish railway scene in the period from around 1967 to 1999. They have now been remastered with improved images and sound, and released as double length programmes on DVD.

Volume 3 starts at Limerick, proceeding to Carrick on Suir via a short detour to the Foynes branch. Then we follow the Cork Main Line south from Limerick Junction. Beyond Cork we journey to Cobh with a visit to the Youghal Branch along the way. We also visit the Kerry line including taking a look at Killarney. Finally we see the workers of Tralee on one of their summer Sunday trips to take the bracing Atlantic air at Fenit.

Volume 4 begins with the electrified DART services. The video follows the former Dublin and South Eastern Railway main line via Bray Head and down the East Coast of Ireland. There is a short feature on the Northern Ireland Railways railcars which once operated over this section, as well as coverage of the ammonia, cement and fertiliser trains which no longer run on this route. We then see the services to Rosslare Harbour before crossing via the South Wexford line to Waterford. The journey back to Cherryville Junction on the Dublin to Cork line is via the line to Kilkenny.

Locomotives featured include 001, 121, 141, 181, 071 and 201 classes, and the rolling stock includes Cravens, Mark 2 and 3 coaches, as well as older wooden bodied stock. More modern rolling stock also appears in the form of Japanese-built railcars. Freights are in the hands of various locomotives, including 001 and 201 class Metropolitan Vickers locomotives dating from the 1950s. During a series of visits to Athy we see a procession of trains, including the former cement working to the Tegral factory.





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Irish Rail Archive Vol.5 - GM Powered (75-mins)


Irish Rail Archive Vol.5 - GM Powered (75-mins)

Ref: MK110D


Features on Irish locomotives powered by General Motors engines. Concentrating on the sight and sound of the trains, with little dialogue, this video covers the following classes during the period 1975 to 2003:

The 001 class - a 1950s design which, after being re-engined with GM powerplants, became the mainstay of the Irish loco fleet until the early 1990s.

The 071 class - Arriving new from GM in 1975, these workhorses powered express passenger trains until their downgrading to secondary passenger and freight duties around the turn of the century.

The 121 class - the locos that set the trend. When these elegant engines arrived from GM in 1961 they were to set new standards for reliability and flexibility, and they stayed in front line duties for more than 40 years.

The 141 and 181 classes - more convenient to operate than the 121s, these all round multi-purpose engines hauled freight and passenger trains all over the Irish network.

The 201 class - After a brief glimpse of the original Metropolitan Vickers 201 class, with their new GM engines, we see the powerful GM 201 class locomotives which have dominated passenger working since their arrival in the mid-1990s.

Trains featured include Inter City, cross country and suburban passenger workings, and pick-up goods, gypsum, ammonia, cement, liner, beer, and sugar beet traffic.





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Irish Rail Archive Vol.6 - Sugar Beet Updated (56-mins)


Irish Rail Archive Vol.6 - Sugar Beet Updated (56-mins)

Ref: MK115D


This video is a completely revised and updated version of “Sugar Beet Archive”, made in 2000. It contains new scenes and brings the story up to date in 2004.

Every year, Irish Rail moves about 150,000 tonnes of sugar beet from Wellington Bridge in County Wexford to the sugar factory at Mallow in County Cork. This video follows the rail activities over 20 years, with General Motors engines hauling the vacuum braked wagons to and from the factory.

After seeing the action at Wellington Bridge, we follow the trains west across the country. We see successively, the Irish Rail 001, small GM, 071 and 201 classes of locomotives, and the loose coupled wagons followed by the unique vacuum braked wagons. We follow the current route to Mallow, as well the line to the former factory at Thurles. Also covered is activity between Waterford and Cherryville Junction during the 2003 year. Also making a guest appearance is Northern Ireland Railways loco 112. Thanks to the kind co-operation of Greencore Ireland we can see the loading and unloading operations in detail.

Producer of the video, Jim Edgar, enthuses “I wish I could go back and photograph it all again just as it was. Although there has been a lot of change, the trains continued to run for twenty years. How much longer this can last is difficult to say. This video allows you to see it at its best.”





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Irish Rail Archive Vol.7 - Loco Hauled Farewell (60-mins)


Irish Rail Archive Vol.7 - Loco Hauled Farewell (60-mins)

Ref: MK117D


In the years 2002 to 2004 rail enthusiasts thought that the haulage of trains by locomotives in Ireland had already fallen to chronically low levels. Little did we know what was to follow - within a couple more years a combination of freight closures and new rolling stock orders would see most Irish locomotives about to become unemployed.

However, during this period two photographers, Mark Kelly and Paul Davis, made video recordings of locomotives at work. This included searching out liner trains running at night, and braving atrocious weather conditions to film trains on disused lines.

This DVD features the 071, 121, 141, 181, and 201 classes giving of their best before the rot finally set in. The coverage of this video is pretty well the entire Irish Rail system. The trains featured include - passenger workings using Cravens, Mark 2 and Mark 3 coaches, while freight coverage includes the Sligo oil traffic, bagged and bulk cement, timber, sugar beet, container and beer traffic. The annual weedspraying operation is seen on the Kingscourt branch and between Mullingar and Athlone, and a rail train is seen between Ennis and Athenry - places not visited by trains nowadays.

This video also features new locations for Markle, from along the banks of the Royal Canal and Longford yard to Limerick Junction North.

Other locations featured include Enfield, Edgeworthstown, freight activity in Longford Yard, Woodlawn, Athenry, Killonan, Limerick Junction and Athy.

Running time 80 minutes approximately





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Irish Railway Review Number 1 (58-mins)


Irish Railway Review Number 1 (58-mins)

Ref: MK108D


A review of the Irish railway scene, concentrating on four areas:

Dublin Area Developments - new trains and stations on the Dublin Area Rapid Transit (DART) system

Antrim by two routes - both the ex-GNR and the ex-NCC routes between Antrim are currently open for traffic, but for how much longer?

The Sligo Line - we see trains and new stations between Dublin and Longford

NIR Then and Now - current and archive shots of the Larne line.

Locations covered include such diverse spots as the established stations at Booterstown in South Dublin and Antrim. New stations include Mossley West in County Antrim and Clontarf Road in Dublin. Trains featured include DART services, NIR diesel electric railcars operating passenger trains to Londonderry, IE container trains and, briefly, the steam hauled ballast trains on the Bleach Green to Antrim line. There are several shots of the latest Japanese -built railcars operating suburban services on the Sligo line.





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Irish Railway Review Number 2 (72-mins)


Irish Railway Review Number 2 (72-mins)

Ref: MK111D


The Limerick Area - see the action in the West, passenger trains to Limerick Junction, Ennis and Roscrea, and freight between the Cement factory and Kilmastulla

Portarlington - a new location for Markle, but certainly well worth a visit.

Network Notes - new liveries for old coaches, the new station at Monasterevan, Heuston developments, IÉ freight in decline, Mossley West opens at last, line blockages at Downhill and the ex-Gatwick stock in action.

NIR Then and Now - current and archive shots of Belfast Termini, York Road, York Gate, Queen’s Quay and Great Victoria Street.

Trains featured include intercity and suburban passenger services, ammonia, shale, cement, sugar beet and container workings. Locomotives include IÉ classes 071, 121, 141, 201, and NIR classes GM, DL, DH and MV.





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Irish Railway Review Number 3 (72-mins)


Irish Railway Review Number 3 (72-mins)

Ref: MK113D


The Waterford Area - we travel along the three lines serving Waterford City. Filmed prior to the Cahir bridge collapse, we see main and branch line passenger trains, and new freight in the shape of timber and liner trains

Lisburn to Antrim Closure - This line has been closed to passengers, and we see the route in its last months. Steam specials are featured on the last day, together with the very low-key final train.

Network Notes - we see DART units in operation, Heuston developments, new CAF railcars and new liveries on older vehicles, mini-CTC, cross country trains still in business, TALGO pocket wagons, and slow running at Downhill.

NIR Then and Now - We carry on from where we left off in IRR2—the Cross Harbour Link line from Yorkgate to Lagan Junction is seen under construction and we travel along the line to get a driver’s eye view.

Network Notes Special - The aftermath of the Cahir Bridge collapsed is considered. We see the damaged bridge, and diverted Sugar Beet and Cement trains.





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Irish Railway Review Number 4 (70-mins)


Irish Railway Review Number 4 (70-mins)

Ref: MK114D


The Mayo lines - we travel along from Portarlington to Ballina, seeing various passenger and freight trains along the way. Featured trains include NIR’s 8208 at Tullamore, 201 Class locos on the Ballina branch trains, and freight as diverse as the Tullamore cement, the Ballina Liner, the Westport timber and the Norfolk liner to Waterford.

Network Notes - we get our first look at the LUAS tram system in Dublin, the saga of the Lisburn to Antrim branch goes on, Cahir viaduct is back in operation, we search out some 141s and find a 121 Class still running, the Dublin suburban network finds a new terminus, we see some rarely photographed liner trains …. and more.

The Cork Area - shows the new daytime Charleville service, just before it was cancelled, and locos and railcars between Mallow and Cobh.

New Railcars and Old Trains - features the decidedly worn NIR railcar fleet and the new CAF units on trial, 071 class locos giving way to railcars on the ex-DSER, and 141s being replaced by railcars on the routes served by Limerick shed.

NIR Then and Now -we catch a glimpse of Poyntzpass before and after modernisation.

And finally … we find NIR’s 112 working hard between the Wexford sugar fields.





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Irish Railway Review Number 5 (71-mins)


Irish Railway Review Number 5 (71-mins)

Ref: MK118D


The Galway Line - now that mini-CTC has been in operation for some time, we see if things have changed for the better

NIR Renewal and 80 class finale - new trains arrive from Spain by sea and road while vintage 80 class stock runs “tidal flow” trains as track renewal gets underway

Network Notes - we take a look at rolling stock around the system, including finding the 29000, 2700, and 80 class units at work, and a look at the RPSI Mark 2 coaches being hauled by the elusive 8113, NIR’s best kept secret.

Gormanston - this ex-GNR station has classic features and a modern passenger service provided by a variety of rolling stock (with Tara, Cement and Liner freight trains too).

The Fall and rise of Liner Trains - as IE pull out of liners we see the last days of the container trains in County Cork (minus containers!), and the Norfolk Liner returns heavy boxes to the IÉ system.

Rolling Stock Test - we compare Cravens, Mark 2s and Mark 3s in Mayo. Taking the passenger perspective, we buy our ticket and travel on all three types of rolling stock.

Western Stations Re-emerge - we travel along the Western Rail Corridor to see several stations which have reappeared, and some which have refused to vanish.

Hell’s Kitchen Museum - We visit the only pub in the world with an engine in the bar.





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Irish Railway Review Number 6 (82-mins)


Irish Railway Review Number 6 (82-mins)

Ref: MK100D


The Sligo Line - we travel further along the line to see how new signalling and rolling stock have changed things over the past two years.

Around Castlerock - NIR’s last semaphore signals in regular use guard this station and the spectacular cliff scenery at nearby Downhill.

Locos on the Mayo Lines - GMs in action in 2006 during the last days of semaphores.

Network Notes - ranges over the system from Ballymoney to Banteer to see the return of the Gatwicks, a ballast train at work, the Sperry wagon, 80 class, and more.

The Last Campaign - 2005 was the final sugar beet campaign, and we say farewell during what was one of the most efficient seasons of rail traffic in recent years.

Gorey and Rathdrum - two attractive stations show a bright image in classic settings.

Cravens in the Cork Area - classic rolling stock on the Mallow and Tralee locals.

Locations covered include Ballina, Ballycullane, Ballyhaunis, Ballymoney, Ballymote, Banteer, Boyle, Broomhedge, Cahir, Carrick on Shannon, Carrick on Suir, Castlebar, Castlerea, Castlerock, Claremorris, Clonmel, Collooney, Cork, Dromod, Enfield, Gorey, Kilmokea, Limerick Junction, Lisburn, Mallow, Manulla, Maynooth, Millstreet, Mullingar, Newbridge, Rathdrum, Rathduff, Rathpeacon, Roscommon, Tipperary, Templemore, University, and Wellington Bridge.





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Northern Ireland Railways Archive (56-mins)


Northern Ireland Railways Archive (56-mins)

Ref: MK106D


Created in 1967, Northern Ireland Railways had the daunting task of taking over the moribund railway system of the Ulster Transport Authority. This disc charts the changes from 1966 to 1999.

In Part One, covering the period back to 1989, features an introduction to

Ulster’s railway system, the recent rolling stock, the track improvements and the Irish Rail operations in the Province. Part Two goes back further in time to examine the locomotives and pioneering railcars inherited by NIR and also the CIE operations in Northern Ireland. It continues with the multiple units and locomotives bought by NIR in the early years. Finally, we take a look at some of the work carried out 30 years ago by the NIR staff.

This part of the video covers railway practices which have long since disappeared from the Northern Ireland scene, such as the carriage of mail and the tending of oil lit semaphore signals.





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Visiting the French Narrow Gauge (82-mins)


Visiting the French Narrow Gauge (82-mins)

Ref: MK116D


These railways represent three aspects of the Narrow Gauge Secondary lines which once criss-crossed the French countryside.

Firstly we see the Chemin de Fer du Vivarais, which operates over a section of the former Reseau du Vivarais. This system once extended to over 120 miles of metre gauge lines linking the Rivers Loire and Rhone. En route, it crossed the Central Massif of France, climbing narrow valleys and crossing rivers by many viaducts. The tourist line from Tournon to Lamastre still captures the essence of this spectacular line, with its articulated Mallet engines passing through dramatic scenery.

On the other hand, the 60cm gauge line at the Pithiviers Transport Museum represents the more modestly engineered roadside lines which once extended across France. Whilst the engines might look like industrial shunters to our eyes, this railway provided a public service for passengers and goods. A fragment of roadside line survives, and this still provides all the atmosphere of the days when such railways triumphed over the rough roads alongside them.

Finally, the lines around the Bay of the River Somme paint a picture of the majority of the metre gauge system in France. These lines fed traffic into the standard gauge, but also carried large amounts of tourist, agricultural and mineral traffic in their own right. These days the Baie de Somme lines still carry tourists around the bay





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